Mission Statement

Mission Statement
From the Editors

Staff

  • Creator
  • Sean Yingling
  • Copy Editors
  • Polly Hughes
  • Blake Hughes
  • Section Editors
  • Alain Lareau
  • Polly Hughes
  • Sean Yingling
  • Blake Hughes
  • Stephen Boss
  • Creative Editors
  • Blake Hughes
  • Stephen Boss
  • Polly Hughes

Plenty is at our doorstep, but a generous use of it languishes in the very sight of the supply. –Franklin D. Roosevelt, First Inaugural, 1933

Those words are just as relevant today as they were in March of 1933. Unfortunately, today there is no FDR, no Harry Hopkins, no Henry Wallace, and worst of all, there is no New Deal. If you are reading this in the United States, then you are, indeed, standing amongst what little remains of the New Deal state. This is the state in which the middle class became the majority of the population; the state which checkmated Fascism and Communism. It put millions of Americans to work in a matter of hours and brought electricity to the poorest parts of the US. The New Deal also created the infrastructure which made possible an educated population capable of putting a human on the Moon and unlocking the secrets of the atom. The U.S. Constitution -not once, but twice- demands a promotion of the General Welfare. The General Welfare includes everyone; be it the college student, the farmer, the business owner, the janitor, the mechanic, the teacher…everyone. Without a doubt, the New Deal promoted the General Welfare. And today we can do even better.


…in every republic there are two parties, that of the nobles and that of the people; and all the laws favorable to liberty result from the opposition of these parties to each other. Niccolo Machiavelli, Discourses on Titus Livius, 1517


Today, the plenty that is at our doorstep is currently being misused and wasted by those whom Roosevelt characterized as “the rulers of the exchange of mankind’s goods” (i.e. Wall Street) and their “speculation with other people’s money.” In the 4th Century BC the Greek philosopher Plato categorized this same class of rulers as The Few. In the Renaissance they were known as The Nobility. The Russians in the 1990’s used the term Oligarch. In the 1930’s many referred to them as Private Economic Interests. In 1935, one pro-New Deal reporter, Marquis Childs, referred to the aristocrats who hated Roosevelt as the Two percent. And of course, today many refer to them as the One Percent.


Plague and pestilence and plunder and pollution, the hazards of nature and the hunger of children, are the foes of every nation. –John F. Kennedy addressing the United Nations, 1963


The greatest danger to the American public is the lowering of our standard of living. Over the last 45 years, since the defeat of the labor movement in 1968, our standard of living has been lowered by roughly two-thirds. And in its place, the nobility have triumphed. Simply put: the General Welfare has been ignored.

Our fight is not against our neighbors, or the church, or the state, or ourselves. The enemies of the modern world are disease, poverty, imperialism, war, genocide, nihilism, austerity, and the usurious and oligarchical bankers who promote it.

The reports and articles found in the World Austerity Report are based largely on the AMERICAN SYSTEM OF POLITICAL ECONOMY - a strategy to curb the assault on the General Welfare by promoting:

A PROTECTIVE TARIFF to stop offshore slave-labor goods (i.e. Walmart) from not only under-cutting our own industry and manufacturing, but also driving down our wages and breaking unions.

A NATIONAL BANK to foster and promote industry and manufacturing, as well as our national laboratories, biomedical research, universities, and space exploration.

INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS, even if they are only developed in one state. Today the term infrastructure would apply to the implementation and full maintenance of Medicare-for-All (Single-Payer Healthcare), Social Security, public education, public housing, high-speed/magnetic levitation rail, irrigation systems, bridges, anything that increases the overall health and productivity of the population.

This is not an ideology. This is a strategy to uplift the nation, and everyone in it. In short, the utopias that we imagine for our world can only be realized in an atmosphere of prosperity, not austerity.